Boxers Movement and Footwork

Boxers Movement and Footwork is extremely crucial to a boxer and is also another essential skill typically overlooked by many beginners. A good boxer will need to learn how to move forward, back, right and left effortlessly.

Correct movement is a vital line of defence, to put it simply when you are out of range you cannot be hit. Learning how to box moving in every direction provides you with a huge edge over an opponent.

Boxers Movement and Footwork
Boxers Movement and Footwork

Boxers Footwork

Endeavor to keep your foot touching the floor at all times. Think move and drag, it’s more of a shuffle rather than a step. Remain in your stance whilst moving to maintain stability and also to stay protected.

Move forward simply by moving with the lead foot first. Move back by stepping with the rear foot first. To put it simply, the foot closest towards the path that you are heading moves first of all.

Move to either the left or right by stepping first with the foot on that side. Never bring your feet together, overstep, or cross over.

A quick change in direction is called pivoting and is made by sweeping the rear foot in either direction, while the lead foot remains on the floor, spinning on the ball of your foot towards the direction you are facing.

Forward Step

  • Stand in the boxing stance.
  • Lift your lead foot very slightly.
  • Push the body forward with the rear foot.
  • After the toes of the lead foot touch the floor, slide the rear foot forward.
  • Keep the feet shoulder-width apart and keep even weight distribution on both legs.

Backward Step

  • Stand in the boxing stance.
  • Lift your rear foot very slightly.
  • Push the body backward with the lead foot.
  • After the toes of the rear foot touch the floor, slide the lead foot backward.
  • Keep the feet shoulder-width apart and keep even weight distribution on both legs.

Left Side Step

  • Stand in the boxing stance.
  • Lift your lead foot very slightly.
  • Push the body to the left side with the rear foot.
  • After the toes of the lead foot touch the floor, slide the rear foot across.
  • Keep the feet shoulder-width apart and keep even weight distribution on both legs.

Right Side Step

  • Stand in the boxing stance.
  • Lift your rear foot very slightly.
  • Push the body to the right side with the lead foot.
  • After the toes of the rear foot touch the floor, slide the lead foot across.
  • Keep the feet shoulder-width apart and keep even weight distribution on both legs.

Boxers Range

It is essential to consider exactly where your feet are placed with regards to your opponent’s. A boxer’s range ought to be one or two inches outside your opponent’s reach.

Bear in mind, if your opponent is out of range to hit you, it’s likely you happen to be out of range to hit them.

Boxers Range
Boxers Range

Most beginner boxers stand either too far from, or too near to their opponent. Standing too far away enables the opponent to relax and restricts what you can do offensively. Standing too close doesn’t provide you with sufficient time to respond and prepare a sensible offensive attack.

Getting in and out of range without getting hit takes a lot of practice.

Preferably, the lead foot is targeted between your opponent’s legs. A line could be drawn from the lead foot towards the opponent’s rear foot, and then another line from the rear foot towards the opponent’s lead foot.

It would look like the boxers are looking at a mirror image of themselves, as the two boxers will probably be seeking to do the exact same stance.

Very often beginners will get caught in the trap of pursuing one another in an anti-clockwise rotation of the ring, whilst trying to maintain this kind of position.


Boxers Rhythm

Boxers should never stand still, a moving target is far more difficult to hit. Rhythm can make it much easier to react offensively as well as defensively.

Although there are several versions, long and short rhythm are more popular.

Boxers Rhythm
Boxers Rhythm

Quite simply long rhythm is moving in, out and side to side with total body movements, more often than not executed out of range. Short rhythm is more lateral in order to avoid straight punches with a bit of in and out and lots of head motion.

Short rhythm is going to be faster when compared to a long rhythm. This is mainly because you happen to be generally moving forward, spending a longer period inside the boxing area where you can get hit.

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