Boxers Hook and Uppercut

The Boxers Hook and Uppercut, the two most challenging punches in boxing to master. The famous Left Hook and the devastating Uppercut power punch.

The Boxers Left Hook

The left hook is an inside power punch and is more effective once you’re near to your opponent, it is considered the most challenging punch in boxing to master.

Unlike the Jab and Right Cross, the Left Hook has technicalities which usually take some time for many boxers to learn.

The Boxers Left Hook
The Boxers Left Hook

You start the punch by shifting your weight to your left side over the left foot. The power for the punch is generated through the legs, hips, and back all pivoting in one action.

  • From your guard position, the left elbow is raised, nearly parallel to the ground, so that the arm forms a hook shape.
  • Keep your arm up, dropping it low lets your opponent know that you are preparing to throw this punch.
  • The fist is turned either palm straight down for any close opponent, or your palm faces you for any opponents that are further away.
  • The arm remains in a fixed 90-degree angle and the punch is delivered by pivoting the left foot, left leg and torso in a powerful, one-piece rotating action.
  • As your punch is delivered, the relaxed closed fist steadily clenches and is totally clenched right before impact.
  • The fist is then instantly relaxed. and brought back the quickest way to your original guard position.

Check

  • Stand in the boxing stance.
  • The Body rotates towards the lead side just a bit.
  • Your Bodyweight shifts to the left leg.
  • Maintain the rear hand up and close to the chin.
  • Swing the lead arm to the target.
  • Keep the elbow bent and at 90 degrees.
  • Maintain your eyes on the opponent.
  • Knuckles point to the opponent (if further away), or Knuckles point upward (if opponent close)
  • After hitting the target, retract the arm quickly along the shortest path possible.
  • Return to the boxing stance

Boxers Right Hook

The right hook is a slower and much easier punch to anticipate when compared to left hooks, therefore the right hook needs to be used only in a combination or when a relatively safe chance occurs.

Boxers Right Hook
Boxers Right Hook
  • From your guard position, the right elbow is raised, nearly parallel to the ground, so that the arm forms a hook shape.
  • Keep your arm up, dropping it low lets your opponent know that you are preparing to throw this punch.
  • The fist is turned either palm straight down for any close opponent, or your palm faces you for any opponents that are further away.
  • The arm remains in a fixed 90-degree angle and the punch is delivered by pivoting the right foot, right leg, and torso in a powerful, one-piece rotating action.
  • As your punch is delivered, the relaxed closed fist steadily clenches and is totally clenched right before impact.
  • The fist is then instantly relaxed. and brought back the quickest way to your original guard position.

Like with the majority of all punches, the Right Hook should be thrown following the Jab or as part of a combination.

Leading with the right hook is not recommended, especially if you miss your opponent where you will be then left off-balance and vulnerable to a counter punch.

Take into account that straight punches are excellent counters for right hooks.

Check

  • Stand in the boxing stance.
  • The Body rotates towards the rear side just a bit.
  • Your Bodyweight shifts to the rear leg.
  • Maintain the lead hand up and close to the chin.
  • Swing the rear arm to the target.
  • Keep the elbow bent and at 90 degrees.
  • Maintain your eyes on the opponent.
  • Knuckles point to the opponent (if further away), or Knuckles point upward (if opponent close)
  • After hitting the target, retract the arm quickly along the shortest path possible.
  • Return to the boxing stance

Boxers Left Uppercut

Uppercuts are punches intended for inside fighting and they are thrown with power from thrusting the legs and torso upwards. It is vital that you move into position by bending the legs as well as, keeping your arms close to your body.

Keep your arm up, dropping it low lets your opponent know that you are preparing to throw this punch.

Boxers Left Uppercut
Boxers Left Uppercut
  • From your guard position, Bring your weight onto your left side, lowering yourself by bending your knees.
  • Drop the left shoulder so your elbow approaches the hip.
  • Turn your palm so it faces you.
  • Make sure your left arm remains close to your body and your right hand is in the guard position.
  • You then thrust your body upwards using the power in your legs, driving the fist upwards into your opponent’s chin without winding up the punch.
  • As your punch is delivered, the relaxed closed fist steadily clenches and is totally clenched right before impact.
  • The fist is then instantly relaxed. and brought back the quickest way to your original guard position.

Check

  • Stand in the boxing stance.
  • Bend the knees just a bit.
  • The Body rotates towards the lead side just a bit.
  • Your Bodyweight shifts to the left leg.
  • Maintain the rear hand up and close to the chin.
  • Rotate the lead arm slightly so the knuckles point at the opponent.
  • Extend the lead arm upward towards the opponent’s chin.
  • Keep the elbow bent.
  • After hitting the target, retract the arm quickly along the shortest path possible.
  • Return to the boxing stance.

Boxers Right Uppercut

As with the left uppercut, your punch is thrown with power from thrusting the legs and torso upwards.

The rear Uppercut is a good punch for breaking an opponents guard open and setting them up for combinations.

Boxers Right Uppercut
Boxers Right Uppercut
  • From your guard position, Bring your weight onto your right side, lowering yourself by bending your knees.
  • Drop the right shoulder so your elbow approaches the hip.
  • Turn your palm so it faces you.
  • Make sure your right arm remains close to your body and your left hand is in the guard position.
  • Slightly step forward and to the outside with your left foot.
  • You then thrust your body upwards using the power in your legs, driving the fist upwards into your opponent’s chin without winding up the punch.
  • As your punch is delivered, the relaxed closed fist steadily clenches and is totally clenched right before impact.
  • The fist is then instantly relaxed. and brought back the quickest way to your original guard position.

Uppercuts should be thrown following the Jab or as part of a combination. Leading with the uppercut is not recommended unless you have your opponent against the ropes and trapped where uppercuts can have a devastating effect if executed correctly.

Check

  • Stand in the boxing stance.
  • Bend the knees just a bit.
  • The Body rotates towards the rear side just a bit.
  • Your Bodyweight shifts to the rear leg.
  • Maintain the lead hand up and close to the chin.
  • Rotate the rear arm slightly so the knuckles point at the opponent.
  • Extend the rear arm upward towards the opponent’s chin.
  • Keep the elbow bent.
  • After hitting the target, retract the arm quickly along the shortest path possible.
  • Return to the boxing stance.

Common Errors when Punching

  • Punching with no rotating of the body.
  • Raising the chin upwards too far.
  • Not guarding the chin.
  • Feet in the incorrect position after and before throwing a punch.
  • Fists not rotated properly.
  • Arms low or sideways immediately after throwing a punch.
  • Slow retracting hand back to guard position.

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